Modeling the interaction between episodic and semantic memory in the extralist cued recall task

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has title::Modeling the interaction between episodic and semantic memory in the extralist cued recall task
status: ongoing
Master: project within::Cognitive Science
Student name: student name::Armand Stefan Rotaru
Dates
Start start date:=2011/02/18
End end date:=2011/07/31
Supervision
Supervisor: Martijn Meeter
Second reader: has second reader::Sander Los
Company: has company::UvA
Poster: has poster::Media:Media:Posternaam.pdf

Signature supervisor



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Abstract

Currently, an ambitious goal in the field of memory research is to build a general, unified model for human long-term memory. Such a model should be able to accommodate a large number of experimental findings related to explicit (declarative)and implicit (non-declarative) memory, at both a qualitative and quantitative level. One promising candidate for this enterprise is SAM (Search of Associative Memory), developed by Raaijmakers and Shiffrin (1981), which was initially designed as a model for free recall. However, it has been shown that SAM can be successfully generalized and extended as to account for paired-associate recall (Raaijmakers & Shiffrin, 1981), recognition (REM; Shiffrin & Steyvers, 1997), lexical decision (REM-LD; Wagenmakers et al., 2004), false recall (fSAM; Kimball et al., 2007), as well as other tasks and effects.

In this context, our goal is to examine whether the framework introduced by SAM can be further adapted in order to explain the interaction between semantic and episodic memory in the extralist cued recall task. The project will involve building a computational model for the task, testing the model using actual subject data (Nelson et. al., 1998a) and comparing the behaviour of the model with that of other models for the same task, such as PIER 2 (Nelson et al., 1998b). More specifically, we will focus on two aspects of the task at hand: firstly, we will investigate the relative contribution of forward and backward connections between the cue, the target and their associates; secondly, we will attempt to quantify the individual roles of the semantic and episodic components of the retrieval process.


References:


Kimball, D.R., Smith, T.A. & Kahana, M.J. (2007). The fSAM model of false recall. Psychological Review, 114, 954-993.

Nelson, D. L., McEvoy, C. L., & Schreiber, T. A. (1998a). The university of South Florida word association, rhyme, and word fragment norms. (http://w3.usf.edu/FreeAssociation/)

Nelson, D.L., McKinney, V.M., Gee, N.R., & Janczura, G.A. (1998b). Interpreting the influence of implicitly activated memories on recall and recognition. Psychological Review, 105, 299-324.

Raaijmakers, J.G.W. & Shiffrin, R.M. (1981). Search of associative memory. Psychological Review, 88, 93-134.

Shiffrin, R. M., & Steyvers, M. (1997). A model for recognition memory: REM — retrieving effectively from memory. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 4, 145–166.

Wagenmakers, E.J.M., Steyvers, M., Raaijmakers, J.G.W., Shiffrin, R.M., Van Rijn, H., & Zeelenberg, R. (2004). A model for evidence accumulation in the lexical decision task. Cognitive Psychology, 48, 332-367.


Abstract KIM 1

Currently, an ambitious goal in the field of memory research is to build a general, unified model for human long-term memory. Such a model should be able to accommodate a large number of experimental findings related to explicit (declarative)and implicit (non-declarative) memory, at both a qualitative and quantitative level. One promising candidate for this enterprise is SAM (Search of Associative Memory), which can already account for a vast number of effects associated with episodic memory. In this context, our goal is to examine whether the framework introduced by SAM can be adapted in order to explain the interaction between semantic and episodic memory in the extralist cued recall task. More specifically, we will focus on two aspects of the task at hand: firstly, we will investigate the relative contribution of forward and backward connections between the cue, the target and their associates; secondly, we will attempt to quantify the individual roles of the semantic and episodic components of the retrieval process. The project will initially involve building a computational model for the task and comparing the behaviour of the model with that of other models for the same task, such as PIER 2. Finally, we will assess the validity of our model using actual subject data and we will run a new experiment in order to further test the predictions of our model.